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Kiwi kids and the Lockdown

How did Kiwi kids handle the lockdown?  Did they breathe a sigh of relief for not having to go to school? Did they take refuge in social media as whole  communities vanished from cities and country roads alike, in the most punishing of categories – Level 4?

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TVNZ’s 60th – sort of…

Ten years ago TVNZ ‘celebrated’ its first 50 years.

A Light Entertainment programme  was hosted by Jason Gunn in front of an Auckland rent-a-crowd  at  the the Casino Theatre, and long term Television staff were incensed at what they saw.

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No easy fix…  

What should an Oranga Tamariki social worker do (when uplifting a Maori child) to help the child’s parents feel better about themselves? I pose this question after reading the Commissioner for Children’s report on the practice of ‘uplifting’ children and failing to make the parents feel better about themselves.

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Counting Our Blessings

Here’s why we should all feel particularly glad to live in New Zealand at this time, and not only because Covid-19 has gone.

First, because we have no natural predators, and secondly the three rapacious leaders of America, China and Russia don’t think we are worth bothering with. And just in case they do happen to look our way, they will be confused by our headlines.

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Sins of the fathers…

Labour wants it, sort of. Aucklanders deserve it.  New Zealand First at this stage at least, has blocked it.  As a result, Auckland’s roads are quite simply,  constipated. It could be the increase in  car commuting  but also rapid population growth.

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Superstitions – Baldness

In spite of extensive advertising claims to the contrary, most men afflicted by baldness find the condition irreversible. An American superstition claims that baldness can be delayed by cutting the existing hair very short then singeing the cut ends. Another superstition claims that when a man starts to go bald, he can slow the process by stuffing cyclamen leaves up his nose.  And sprinkling parsley seeds on the head three times a year is also believed to help.

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