We’re all about television this edition, because major changes are about to be announced to the present, clapped out model. TVNZ producer and director Chris Bourn, re-visits times when our telly, felt as if it was part of us. Regular Kiwiboomers contributor Chris Horan is similarly nostalgic, while  media academic Geoff Lealand, lists three Christmas wishes for TV and RNZ. My contribution outlines how Governments with kooky agendas ever got to this point. What do our writers share? A longing  for something Governments have ignored since Kiwi television began: a non-commercial public broadcaster, which serves and salves our needs as a community.   

Christchurch today – wreckage, and renewal

Standing on the fourth-floor balcony of Tūranga, Christchurch’s recently opened library sited on Cathedral Square, I gazed down onto the sagging ruin that is the post-earthquake Christchurch Cathedral. From this angle the decision to restore makes even less sense than it did three years ago when I viewed the wreckage from behind a ground level wire-mesh safety fence.

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Kiwi TV when it was full of promise…

It will seem mean to those who think the demise of TV3 is a shame, but I’m glad it’s gone and gladder still to see the beginning of the end of all television as we have come to know it. The dying distorted remnants of what was once an entertaining, informative and artistic public service has had its day after far too many years in expelling noisy, lingering death throes.

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All I want for Christmas is…

First I must declare that I’m involved with Better Public Media, so it is very apparent what I want from television in New Zealand.

But I also want more for other sectors of the media, for I have drifted away from mainstream (linear, scheduled) television and have joined the Netflix generation.  When I drift back to Television New Zealand or TV3, these channels seem like foreign places, where narratives are jarringly interrupted by extended breaks of increasingly banal adverts.

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Kiwiosities: The Dundonald Coracle

A framework of Koromiko tied together with rope and wire, now in Canterbury Museum, recalls the way that shipwrecked sailors paddled to the main (sub-antarctic) Auckland Island to await rescue in 1907. The four-masted barque, The Dundonald  struck Disappointment Island on March 7, 1907 and  the survivors struggled ashore from her top masts.

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Max’s Dogs – Every Dog has its day

When pioneer Scottish settlers in the nineteenth century arrived in the southern part of New Zealand, the terrain was a challenge – but they had brought their dogs. In the area known as the Mackenzie country (where part of The Lord of the Rings was filmed over a hundred years later), the mountainous plateau might have remained unfarmed had it not been for the hard work of the shepherds and their tireless dogs.

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Rainbow tickery…

Rainbow Tick is a business, like the halal certification business, it gives organisations a tick for behaving in the manner the certifier approves. The Muslim Islamic Council provides certification to businesses that kill their animals with a single cut, that are thoroughly bled, and have not come into contact with animals (pork especially) that have been stunned before being slaughtered.

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People before planes

When you land at an international airport it’s as if you’re still in the one you left. What they also have in common is a building programme that’s been going on for decades with no end in sight. Airports are goldmines. Which is why Queenstown Airport Corporation has Wanaka in its sights and Auckland is eyeing up Whenuapai.

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