Category archive: NZ History

The Unholy Triad

I’ve always struggled to understand economics, which means I have a bit of cheek embarking on   a view of the economics of the western world. Still, in my possibly naive view there are simple rules. Take Alzheimers for instance. By taking daily exercise, eating healthy food and maintaining mental and social stimulation, there is a good chance of avoiding Alzheimers. Similar rules apply for avoiding type 2 diabetes and heart disease, and probably many other diseases that swoop in when the rules are ignored.

Continue reading

Rangi Walker – visionary

Rangi WalkerIn the protest decade of the 60s and 1970s, my reporting beat covered Auckland University where, being the Sixties, full-time students were also part-time protesters.

Their activism embraced everything from feminism and environmental issues to the most riveting of the time – the growing protests against the Vietnam War and Apartheid.

Continue reading

Beware Greeks bearing gifts….

130207-billboard-morning-hold-2A bus strike in Auckland  – how strange that  was  when  media  reported little in the way of carpooling,  the tactic which served locals well  in the oil shocks of the 1970s.   Another hint of the collapse of community?  Aucklanders  were warned  about the obvious traffic jams ahead – as if there aren’t any most other days.   The city’s woeful dependence on cars is its major failure and in Wellington that hasn’t been helped by a lack of vision.

Continue reading

Baby boomers – a mini history

One million baby boomers – and we’re still here…

We boomed when the guns fell silent in World War II. And we’ve been heard and felt ever since. Relatively few countries experienced the phenomenon of the Baby Boom and the countries that did – Australia, the United States, Canada, England and New Zealand, shared a number of social and cultural features.

Continue reading

Avonside post-quake, picture courtesy of Avonsideblog.org '

Renewal – Christchurch in Spring

Much has changed between my occasional visits to Christchurch in the last four and a half years.

On my first post-earthquakes visit I was awed by wrecked buildings, broken roads, tell-tale see pages that told of cracked water-pipes, portable toilets in the streets, tangles of steel reinforcing on what looked like bomb-sites, barricades, soldiers, and silence in a city echoing sorrow.

Continue reading