Economy  is  a tight spot in airlines. You board with  a middle seat pass and realise that an enormous, bearded man  is in the more coveted aisle seat next to you.  My other flight mate was a pakeha banker. The Fearsome One  didn’t talk until landing cards were handed out. I lamented to  nobody in particular that I  didn’t have a pen.  The banker was watching Dunkirk, but the man from New Guinea’s highlands  began to search  every pocket  unsuccessfully  for a pen. Finally he asked a  stewardess, for one, insisted I use it first, and then as I stowed away  some stereotypes, he said he was a trainee pilot. Even cramped travel  broadens  the mind.

Encounters… with a flying pot

So you’re  at the kitchen bench and  acting like a 16 year old  –  though you know that was  half a century ago.    You   plonk a  heavy pot almost  playfully and… misjudge. Its rim heads with relentless accuracy to  the  one  part of your  foot not covered by slippers.

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Letter to a Mayor…

It’s autumn so it’s timely to let a weathered leaf from the  season of our life drift into the summer of another’s – in this case New Plymouth Mayor, Neil Holdom.

Some time ago he described baby boomers as ‘ the most selfish generation’. And then on Facebook and presumably a few other places,  he apologised.  His j’accuse was similar to comments  by any of the critics of boomers, some so young they could pass for the grandchildren of the first boomer cohort.

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My friend – the earwig

Let me start with tomatoes. My home grown tomatoes have thin skins and flesh as dense and true  as wild meat. I have red, orange and pinkish heritage type with a variety of wonderful favours. But we have a short growing season and my toms are just about finished, which is why my wife bought some supermarket tomatoes.

I ate half of one.

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The Bad Ass Librarians of Timbuktu

When this wacky titled book, turned up – some new age novel I thought.

Not so. This is a true story about the jihadist takeover of the real Timbuktu and the remarkable story of one man’s finding, collecting and then saving hundreds of thousands of priceless manuscripts in Timbuktu.

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To Waiheke with love

Bumped into an old friend the other day. Goes by the name of Waiheke. Used to know the place well when the S.S. Baroona chugged into the channel and about an hour later, discharged us on to Matiatia’s humble wharf.

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Who Really Owns Cadburys, Dunedin?

Property is a commodity, a possession, which may be sold or disposed of as the owner sees fit. After the transaction is legitimised by a legal document, justice and all democratic and economic requirements of fairness to all parties is served. It’s simple really.

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Going off the rails…

Were we supposed to go WOW!  when the Government announced it  would  build a rail  link to Auckland  airport by… 2030? Maybe 2050?

TV3 news (sorry,  Newshub)  carried the story  last month.   And it  featured something  so familiar  that it  felt  like déjà vu,  yet there it was on  our TV screens.  

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